ancientart:

The Neolithic Ring of Brodgar, Orkney, Scotland.
The exact age of the site is currently uncertain, although it is thought to have been erected between 3000-2000 BCE -making it the last of the great Neolithic monuments built on the Ness.

Standing sentinel over what was almost certainly an important route across the island, and clearly visible from all around, it occupied a position of great importance and influence.
The site achieved astronomical notoriety in the 1970s when Alexander Thom and his son first published the theory that it was a sophisticated lunar observatory. According to the Thoms, various alignments at the site, mostly between the outlying cairns, were deliberately aligned upon horizon foresights that marked limiting risings and setting positions in the moon’s complex cycles. The Ring of Brodgar, more than any other single monument, demonstrates the dangers of over-enthusiastic interpretation in archaeoastronomy  TIme has dealt harshly with the “lunar observatory” hypothesis.
-Ancient Astronomy, Clive Ruggles.

Photo courtesy & taken by Phil Norton.

ancientart:

The Neolithic Ring of Brodgar, Orkney, Scotland.

The exact age of the site is currently uncertain, although it is thought to have been erected between 3000-2000 BCE -making it the last of the great Neolithic monuments built on the Ness.

Standing sentinel over what was almost certainly an important route across the island, and clearly visible from all around, it occupied a position of great importance and influence.

The site achieved astronomical notoriety in the 1970s when Alexander Thom and his son first published the theory that it was a sophisticated lunar observatory. According to the Thoms, various alignments at the site, mostly between the outlying cairns, were deliberately aligned upon horizon foresights that marked limiting risings and setting positions in the moon’s complex cycles. The Ring of Brodgar, more than any other single monument, demonstrates the dangers of over-enthusiastic interpretation in archaeoastronomy  TIme has dealt harshly with the “lunar observatory” hypothesis.

-Ancient Astronomy, Clive Ruggles.

Photo courtesy & taken by Phil Norton.

thewanderingcelt:

I’ve had people asking what my tattoos are from while out and about. So I figured I’d talk about them here. The cuffs are a La Tene design from a bronze arm ring found in Newnham Croft in Cambridgeshire. The cross is a Cros Bride, or Brigid’s Cross. There is an example of one I made and a better one from Wikipedia.

thewanderingcelt:

I’ve had people asking what my tattoos are from while out and about. So I figured I’d talk about them here. The cuffs are a La Tene design from a bronze arm ring found in Newnham Croft in Cambridgeshire. The cross is a Cros Bride, or Brigid’s Cross. There is an example of one I made and a better one from Wikipedia.